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Concrete Cutting Sawing Greenfield NH New Hampshire

Welcome to AffordableConcreteCutting.Net

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Greenfield New Hampshire? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 603-622-4441

We Service Greenfield NH and all surrounding Cities & Towns

“No Travel Charges – Ever! Guaranteed!”

Concrete Cutting Greenfield NH

Concrete Cutter Greenfield NH    

Concrete Coring Greenfield NH  

Core Drilling Greenfield NH                     

Concrete Sawing Greenfield NH

Concrete Sawing Greenfield New Hampshire

Concrete Cutting Greenfield New Hampshire  

Concrete Cutter Greenfield New Hampshire    

Concrete Coring New Hampshire           

Core Driller Greenfield NH            

Core Drilling Greenfield New Hampshire                      

The image shows the cross-section of a Concrete pile used in the foundations of the buildings for the Simmons Hardware Company, Sioux City, Iowa, and for John J. Latteman, Brooklyn, N.Y. The pile tapers from 16 inches at the large end to 11 inches at the small end. The reinforcement consists of Clinton electrically-welded is usually No. 20 gauge. When it is desirable to reinforce these concrete piles, the bars are inserted in the shell after the core has been withdrawn and before the concrete is placed. The different methods for producing the Simplex pile cover the two general classifications of concrete piles—namely, those molded in place, and those molded above ground and driven in with a pile-driver. Fig. 58 shows the standard methods of producing the Simplex pile. In Fig. 58, A shows a cast-iron point which has been driven and imbedded in the ground, the concrete deposited, and the concrete forms partially withdrawn; while B shows the alligator point driving concrete forms. The only difference between the two concrete forms shown in this figure is that the alligator point is withdrawn and the cast- iron point remains in the ground. The concrete in either type is compacted by its own weight. As the concrete form is removed, the concrete comes in contact with the soil and is bonded with it. The inherent danger in using this type of pile is that, if a stream of water is encountered, the cement may be washed out of the concrete before it has a chance to set. A shell pile and a molded and driven pile are also produced by the same company which manufactures the Simplex, and are recommended for use under certain conditions. Any of these types of concrete piles can be reinforced with steel. This company has driven concrete piles 20 inches in diameter and 75 feet long. In excavating for the foundation of a 16- story building at 14th Street and 5th Avenue, New York, a pocket of quicksand was discovered with a depth of about 14 feet below the driven. The work was done with care, and a direct contact was secured between them, and the finished lower surfaces of the cast-iron caps, without the intervention of steel shims. A pile supports a load coming on an area of the foundation which is approximately proportional to the spacing between the concrete piles. This area, of course, is several times the area of the top of the pile. It is therefore necessary to cap at least a group of the concrete piles with a platform or grillage which not only will support any portion of the load located between the concrete piles, but which also will tend to prevent a concentration of load on one pile and will distribute the load more or less uniformly over all the concrete piles. Sometimes such a platform is made of heavy concrete piles, especially if timber is cheap; but this should never be done unless the grillage will be always under water; and even under such conditions the increasing cost of timber usually makes it preferable to construct the grillage of concrete. A concrete grillage is usually laid with its lower surface a foot or two below the tops of the concrete piles. The concrete piles are thus firmly anchored together at their tops. The thickness of the grillage is roughly proportional to the load per square foot to be carried. No close calculations are possible; a thickness of from 2 to 5 feet is usually made. When reinforced-concrete structures are supported on concrete piles or other concentrated points of support, the heads of the concrete piles are usually connected by reinforced-concrete concrete beams, which will be described in Part III. A combination of steel, concrete, and wooden concrete piles is known as the Cushing pile foundation. A cluster of concrete piles is driven so that it may be surrounded by a wrought- iron or steel cylinder, which is placed over them, and which is sunk into the soil until it is below any chance of scouring action on the part of any current of water.

Are You in Greenfield New Hampshire? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 603-622-4441

We Service Greenfield NH and all surrounding Cities & Towns